Regulatory changes

Are there any anticipated regulatory changes which will alter the regulatory landscape for corporate green energy and corporate PPAs?

International development partners are providing technical support to the Angolan government to establish a regulatory framework which includes negotiating power purchase agreements with independent power producers (IPPs) and design of a feed-in-tariff scheme for renewables.

Last modified 9 Feb 2021

Proposed regulatory changes have stalled in recent times as a result of lack of Government buy-in and competing priorities (ie the COVID-19 pandemic).  At the time of writing there are no imminent regulatory changes proposed that would have an adverse impact on Corporate PPAs.

Last modified 16 Dec 2020

Bahrain’s National Renewable Energy Action Plan (“NREAP”) was finalized in October 2016. The NREAP identifies feasible renewable energy options for Bahrain, sets the targets, and proposes policies and initiatives to achieve these targets. In addition, the NEEAP was also introduced simultaneously, whereby the target is to use less energy for the same output or service. [1]

To achieve the aforementioned targets, the decree No. 87 of 2019 was issued for the establishment of the Sustainable Energy Authority (“SEA”). [2]

The SEA proposes initiatives and projects through which sustainable energy sources are updated and developed to increase the percentage of their contribution to the total energy and achieve Bahrain’s strategies for sustainability, safe supply and ways to implement initiatives and projects and to provide them with the necessary support.

The SEA directs the private sector and encourages the establishment of private or joint ventures with other entities that aim to raise energy efficiency and the use of sustainable energy sources to generate electric power. [3]

[1] ibid.
[2]  Decree No. 87 of 2019 was issued for the establishment of the Sustainable Energy Authority
[3] No. (5).

Last modified 16 Dec 2020

It is currently not possible to have on-site PPAs covering more than one specific location for offtake, i.e. where a generator supplies electricity through a direct line (bypassing the public grid) that connects various installations offtaking the electricity that have separate connections to the public grid. This is not allowed as it is deemed to detract from the exclusive rights of the transmission system operator or the distribution system operator, whatever is the case.

This prohibition may in the future be relaxed under certain specific conditions, pursuant to the implementation in Belgium (at the federal level and in the three regions with competence for the electricity market) of the EU’s Electricity Market Design Directive and Regulation. The implementing legislation is currently being prepared.

Last modified 25 Feb 2021

The establishment of BERA promises to bring about a change in the operation and regulation of the energy sector.

Last modified 9 Feb 2021

Modernization of the Brazilian Power Sector

At the beginning of 2019, the federal government announced its plan to submit a set of measures to modernize the regulation of the electricity sector and the Ministry of Mines and Energy (MME) formed a work group for such purpose. The work group presented an action plan and proposals for the modernization of the power regulation and MME created a committee to enable the effective execution of the action plan. The modernization plans encompass several different topics. In addition to those mentioned below, other proposals are being analysed, such as review of the public bidding system, governance, simplification and improvement of procedures and insertion of new technologies in the sector.

Expansion of the Free Market

In the past years, the Brazilian power market has seen an expansion of the Free Market, increasing the direct participation of corporate consumers in the energy sector. In December 2019, the MME issued Ordinance No. 465/2019, which set yearly charge reductions for the consumer to be able to acquire power in the Free Market. By January 2023, the required charge amount shall be reduced to 500kW.

Review of Incentives

Small hydro, solar, wind, biomass and qualified cogeneration projects currently receive a subsidy in the form of a discount of 50% in transmission and distribution tariffs. These subsidies are currently under review. Please refer to Item 10 for further details.

Changes to the Spot Market Price

As from January 2021, the spot market price, which is currently determined on a weekly basis, will begin to be calculated on an hourly basis. This change is expected to better reflect the complexity of the country’s power sector and adequately represent the greater insertion of renewables in the matrix. It will also allow the creation of new products in the power trading market, with countless flexibility combinations.

Last modified 16 Dec 2020

The approval of reforms that could significantly alter the current scenario on corporate green energy and corporate PPAs is not considered at this time.

Last modified 16 Dec 2020

The Ministry of Energy has recently launched a Mission of energy transformation and modernization of the electricity industry: roadmap for the energy of the future. The Mission has already recommended to the Ministry to enable CPPAs directly negotiated and executed between a corporate buyer and an Independent Power Producer.

In December 2020 the Ministry of Energy will launch the roadmap and will establish If such recommendation will be included in the regulatory agenda for 2020.

Last modified 16 Dec 2020

The EU Clean Energy Package introduces recast legislation, including the Energy Efficiency Directive (Directive (EU) 2018/2002), the Renewable Energy Directive (Directive (EU) 2018/2001) and Energy Union Governance Regulation (Regulation (EU) 2018/1999), which are designed to cover the electricity and renewables markets from 2021 to 2030. The Energy Efficiency Directive sets an indicative target for energy efficiency of 32.5% by 2030. The Renewable Energy Directive increases the consumption target from renewables to 32% by 2030, and the target to at least 14% of transport fuel originating from renewable sources by 2030.

In mid-July, as part of the biggest ever package of climate action, the EU proposed to increase the existing target of 32%. The proposal would also see the EU as a whole reduce energy consumption by nine per cent by 2030 compared to current levels.

In January 2020, the Czech Republic published its National Energy and Climate Plan. The document contains objectives and key policies in all five dimensions of the Energy Union. Through this document, Member States are obliged, among other things, to inform the European Commission of their national contribution to the agreed European targets for greenhouse gas emissions, renewable energy, energy efficiency and electricity and transmission system interconnectivity.

Last modified 26 Jul 2021

As things stand right now, Ethiopian energy laws do not comprehensively regulate cPPAs, for this reason it is difficult to predict which forms of cPPAs the government may or may not adopt. However, we expect the area to be regulated soon shedding light on forms of cPPA companies may enter into as the government intends to use off-grid electrification as one of the means to meet its national electrification goals.

Last modified 18 Feb 2021

We are currently not aware of any regulatory changes that might affect the regulatory landscape for corporate green energy and corporate PPAs in Finland. Almost all political parties are, however, committed to targets set by the EU to reduce to greenhouse gas emissions and to enhance the regulatory and financial prerequisites for renewables.

However, the governmental goal referred to in Challenges and the overall aim to reduce emissions may require regulatory changes and economic incentives.

Last modified 16 Dec 2020

For new installations which may benefit from financial support under the "market premium" model, there are currently a number of financial obstacles to entering into a corporate PPA in Germany as a result of current regulations. 

However, the German regulatory framework in relation to renewable energy is constantly under review and development. As such, amendments may be brought in to encourage the deployment of corporate PPAs. 

The German Federal Government has commissioned a study to ascertain how the current support schemes may be further developed, and whether, for example, the introduction of Contracts for Differences (CfDs) may be appropriate (especially in order to reduce the need for statutory support). The study also aims to address whether alternative marketing forms (such as corporate PPAs) may be effectively utilised. However, as the results from this study are not expected until autumn 2021 (following which any proposed legislation or regulations would need to be developed), substantial short term changes to the regulatory framework in Germany in relation to renewable energy are unlikely. 

Nevertheless, the introduction of tendering and auction processes and the reduction in financial support payments for the production and sale of renewable energy, together with the growing appetite of corporate buyers for this type of energy, mean that it is likely that Germany will see an increase in the frequency of corporate PPAs. As highlighted above, also a potential loosening of the prohibition of multiple sales (Doppelvermarktungsverbot) under the German Renewable Energy Act could enhance interest in corporate PPAs.

Last modified 16 Dec 2020

The Ministerial Decree no. 186/2019 (the “New RES Decree”) refers to a public consultation that GME (Gestore dei Mercati Energetici S.p.A.) (“GME”) initiated on 23 January 2020.

Indeed, GME is entrusted with the creation of a market platform for long-term trading of energy from renewable sources, whilst the ARERA (Autorità di Regolazione per Energia Rete e Ambiente) the electricity & gas regulator ("ARERA"), is required to remove any regulatory barriers.

The public consultation document was aimed at receiving comments by electricity market operators on the structure of the PPA Platform depicted by GME, i.e., inter alia:

  • access to the PPA Platform (seller side): electricity market operators producing energy from renewable sources through newly constructed plants, entered into operation after 1 January 2017 and non-benefitting from feed in tariffs on the energy produced. Offers on the platform may also be referred to plants which are not yet built or built whilst not yet operating;
  • access to the PPA Platform (buyer side): traders, wholesalers and large consumers may be admitted to the platform, subject to the obtaining of the electricity market operator license;
  • negotiable products: in order to facilitate the exchanges on the PPA platform, it is proposed the creation of standard contracts, providing for a baseload loading gauge, a minimum duration of 5 years and a maximum duration of 10 years.
  • the role of GME: GME will stand between the seller and the buyer avoiding the parties – in case the financial adequacy assessments of the parties, to be carried out on a yearly basis, have had a positive outcome - to be exposed to insolvency risks;
  • guarantees: rolling guarantees on a yearly basis;
  • OTC clearing: it is proposed to allow the registration with the PPA Platform of PPA contracts executed over the counter, subject to compliance of the contract terms with the standard PPA negotiated on the platform. Following registration, the GME would guarantee the insolvency risks of the parties.

The New RES Decree also provides for the creation of a standard corporate PPA draft to be used in the above-mentioned market platform where subsidy-free energy may be negotiated. Both the owners of energy plants and offtakers (also associated) may access the platform.

Corporate PPAs are introduced as an alternative to the traditional energy incentive system. Indeed, in order to be admitted to the market platform, the plants must be newly built, entered into operation after 1 January 2017 and not benefit from incentives on the energy produced (with the express prohibition for such plants to participate in the auction and registration procedures). In order to access the platform, it will be necessary to obtain a specific qualification from the GSE (Gestore Servizi Energetici) (“GSE”), based on requirements that will be the subject of a specific determination.

Last modified 16 Dec 2020

As highlighted in other answers, changes to the Energy Act in 2019 mean that energy generators may now obtain distribution licenses, empowering them to increase their offering and sell electricity directly to consumers. 

While this is expressly permitted under the Energy Act, the regulations necessary to give effect to these provisions have not yet been put in place, and therefore very few generators have taken steps towards expanding their offering. As indicated above, however, KenGen, announced in late 2020 that it plans to sell power directly to large consumers once the required regulations are put in place.  It is not, however, clear when the regulations will be published.

The government is also currently developing an energy auction plan for wind and solar energy. The auction system is supposed to help with price discovery, thus facilitating the procurement of electricity at the lowest possible price.

Last modified 18 Feb 2021

As mentioned in Challenges, the government has announced the review of the transmission and distribution rates currently available for renewable Self-Supply projects. These special rates are similar to a subsidy, to allow the development of renewable generation. Other that the termination of these special rates, there are no other anticipated regulatory changes.

Last modified 16 Dec 2020

A new Draft Law No. 40-19 reforming law No. 13-09 aiming to improve the legislative and regulatory framework relating to the renewable energy sector in Morocco was published in December 2019 by the Moroccan General Secretariat of the Government. In this reform, the Moroccan legislator is addressing the current legal and technical difficulties faced by the operators, particularly:

Solar Zoning

Draft Law No. 40-19 removed this zoning requirement for solar energy projects. The zoning remains, however, applicable to wind energy projects.

National grid reception capacity and contribution to the stability of the grid

One of the main innovations introduced by Draft Law No. 40-19 is the introduction of the national grid carrying capacity (capacité d’acceuil) defined as the maximum quantity of installed capacity from renewable energy sources that the national grid can accommodate without facing management constraints. This carrying capacity will be fixed by the national electricity transport gird operator following the approval of the National Electricity Regulation Authority.

The publication of the grid reception capacity, following the entry into force of Draft Law No. 40-19, will give more visibility to the operators in order to submit or not the authorization pursuant to Law No. 13-09.

Selling electricity to distribution network operators

Draft Law No. 40-19 introduced the possibility for distribution network operators to acquire up to 40% of the total energy supplied from renewable energy sources.
 
In order to develop projects under the self-consumption regime, a draft bill was published on the website of the General Secretariat of the Government on 19 November 2020. This draft bill introduces a new self-consumption regime depending on whether or not the installation is connected to the grid.

This new regime allows for better visibility and greater transparency as to how the installations are operated and, where applicable, connected to the grid.

Last modified 10 Feb 2021

In October 2017, the government launched the review and amendment of the 1997 electricity law, to modernise it and put it on par with best practices in the sector, including unbundling the value chain as controlled by EDM the national utility company so that generators may sell electricity directly to corporate buyers. This process is still ongoing as of January 2021.

Last modified 1 Feb 2021

The EU Clean Energy Package introduces recast legislation, including the Energy Efficiency Directive (Directive (EU) 2018/2002), the Renewable Energy Directive (Directive (EU) 2018/2001) and Energy Union Governance Regulation (Regulation (EU) 2018/1999), which are designed to cover the electricity and renewables markets from 2021 to 2030. The Energy Efficiency Directive sets an indicative target for energy efficiency of 32.5% by 2030. The Renewable Energy Directive increases the consumption target from renewables to 32% by 2030, and the target to at least 14% of transport fuel originating from renewable sources by 2030.

Last modified 16 Dec 2020

No.

Last modified 16 Dec 2020

Material amendments to the energy legal framework are expected to be introduced by the government in the next few months. These changes will mainly modify energy pricing and market rules, but none are expected to directly alter the PPA regulatory landscape. Those who qualify as free customers will continue to freely negotiate the terms of their agreements, while PPAs designed to meet the demand of regulated consumers will be subject to stricter regulations and supervision from OSINERGMIN.

Last modified 16 Dec 2020

In February 2019, the President of South Africa announced a proposal to unbundle Eskom into three separate businesses, namely generation, transmission and distribution – each of which will be housed in separate legal entities under Eskom Holdings SOC Limited. Since then, the process of unbundling has begun and, at the date of this report, we believe that divisional boards have been established and managing directors appointed for each of the business units. The unbundling is expected to be complete by the end of 2022 and will have a considerable impact on the structure of the energy market. It is likely this will necessitate regulatory changes to cater for, and differentiate between, the roles of each of the separate unbundled Eskom entities in the wider energy market.

Interesting to note is that circa 10,000MW of generation capacity in South Africa is scheduled to be retired in the next 10 years, which creates the need for new generation capacity, much of which we believe (at this stage) will be procured from the private sector and, more specifically, clean or renewable energy sources. Regulatory reform and policy alignment (particularly in policy planning documents such as the integrated resource plan, as above) will be crucial to ensuring that sufficient generation capacity is procured from the private sector.

Last modified 16 Dec 2020

There is no specific regulation for PPAs in Spain. The only legal framework is Article 24 of the Electricity Sector Act 2013, which establishes a general principle of freedom to contract electricity. No model templates for PPAs have been issued by Spanish regulators. However, the Spanish Government considers PPA’s as a key pillar for renewable energy development. In this respect, there are several initiatives at national level to eliminate some barriers and promote these contracts:

  • A new draft Statute of electro-intensive consumers was open to hearing and public information on February 2020. This statute promotes “bilateral term contracts between consumers and renewable generators” (PPAs). Furthermore, this document sets up the development of State financial guaranties as a support (the Government created the Spanish Reserve Fund for guarantees of electro intensive entities, theoretically endowed with EUR 200 million). However, the Statute has not been approved yet and such delay is related with the political difficulties in approving the new Budget in the Parliament.
  • NECP (National Energy Climate Plan 2021-2030), approved by the Government on March 2020 and submitted to the European Commission, also encourages these long-term contracts. Measure 1.10 of the NECP foresees mechanisms to reduce the risk of these operations.
  • As pointed out below, Royal Decree-Law 23/2020 has added a new provision related to the specific remuneration scheme for green energy (see num. 10). The regulatory development has not yet been approved.

Last modified 16 Dec 2020

In Sweden, government support for renewable energy is provided by way of electricity certificate system instead of a feed-in tariff system or other similar systems. The certificate system requires certain producers and large consumers of electricity to purchase electricity certificates on the open market. Ultimately the costs for the system are passed on to the consumers via the electricity bill. 

It is our understanding that the Swedish government is considering phasing out current onshore wind subsidies, although at present the stated intention is to increase the purchasing quotas until 2030 with the obligations to acquire certificates subsisting until 2045. The move comes due to the fact that the Swedish government believes that onshore wind projects are profitable enough without a subsidy. Instead the Government has outlined that investment will be encouraged by other means. There are concerns with the extension of the green certificate system however, as some argue that this will drive down the value of certificates and deter investors if targets for renewable energy have already been reached.

Last modified 16 Dec 2020

Not at the moment.

Last modified 9 Feb 2021

Net metering regulations for rooftop solar were prepared by the Saudi Arabian electricity regulator in 2018. To our knowledge there were never commercially utilised.  A new set of regulations have been prepared, including provisions for wheeling of power. However, until they are published and adopted by the national utility we do not expect to see material changes there.

Elsewhere in the GCC, net metering concepts have generally been adopted and their application is growing.  Jordan has perhaps the longest running and most flexible regulatory regime for corporate PPAs.

Last modified 21 Jan 2021

The EU Clean Energy Package introduces recast legislation, including the Energy Efficiency Directive (Directive (EU) 2018/2002), the Renewable Energy Directive (Directive (EU) 2018/2001) and Energy Union Governance Regulation (Regulation (EU) 2018/1999), which are designed to cover the electricity and renewables markets from 2021 to 2030. The Energy Efficiency Directive sets an indicative target for energy efficiency of 32.5% by 2030. The Renewable Energy Directive increases the consumption target from renewables to 32% by 2030, and the target to at least 14% of transport fuel originating from renewable sources by 2030. GB has not yet consulted on the implementation of this, and it remains unclear whether GB will voluntary adopt the Renewable Energy Directive.

In January 2019, BEIS published GB's draft National Energy and Climate Plan (NECP) for 2021 to 2030. This does not contain new policy announcements, however, it acknowledges that despite GB's plans to leave the EU, it is still seeking cooperation with the EU to support the delivery of clean, cost-efficient and secure energy supplies.

Whilst the EU is a party to the Paris Agreement, the UK (as other EU member states) is itself a signatory and as such will continue to be bound by its own decarbonization commitments under its Nationally Determined Constributions post-Brexit. Material changes to the UK's commitment to addressing climate change are, therefore, not expected.

Last modified 16 Dec 2020

With the election of a new President in the US in 2020, there is an expectation that legislation in support of the development of renewable generation projects and related technologies like energy storage may be forthcoming. This could be in the form of extended or expanded federal tax credits or policy or new legislation, directives to federal agencies or executive orders. This is in addition to the requirements and regulation of the energy industry that applies at the state level based on the location of the project.  

Last modified 24 Mar 2021

Angola

Angola

To what extent are corporate PPAs presently deployed and what sort of structure do they take?

Corporate PPAs remain uncommon in Angola. 

Article 48 of the Electricity General Law provides that outside the scope of the public electric system, the conditions of sale of electric energy will be established by the parties.

Article 15 of the Executive Decree No. 122/19 of May 24 (electric energy sales tariffs) provides special arrangements for the sale of electricity by means of special or bilateral contracts between producers and distributors and those with final customers, under the terms set out in the Tariff Regulations (Presidential Decree No. 4/11 of January 6) shall be authorized by an order of the Minister of Energy and Waters, after hearing the regulatory authority.

All the contracts with National Transportation Network ("RNT" as a sole buyer must comply with certain requirements specified in Article 11 of the Presidential Decree No. 4/11 of January 6 as amended by Article 11 of the Presidential Decree 178/20 of June 25, in order to their prices are allocated to tariffs.

Do the country's regulators allow corporate owners to purchase (1) directly from a facility, or (2) from a choice of suppliers?

In accordance with Article 11 of the General Electricity Law, the use of the facilities and networks that incorporate the Public Electricity System is allowed under the conditions provided for in the aforementioned regulation or agreed between the interested parties and their holders, as long as the supervisory body approves it after prior validation by the regulatory authority.

Hence, corporate owners are allowed to purchase directly from a facility or a choice of suppliers, as long as it has been approved by the supervisory body and has effectively gone through a prior validation from the regulatory authority.

Other than the generator and the off-taker, are any third parties commonly party to the PPA structure (e.g. a utility or other market agent)?

In addition to the electrical energy provided by the Company ENDE E.P (National Electricity Distribution Company) that comes from hydraulic dams and private generators, so far, there are no other third parties as a common party to the cPPA structure.

Is a generator permitted to sell electricity directly to an end user? If so, do they require a licence or other form of authorization?

As previously stated, Article 48 of the Electricity General Law provides that outside the scope of the public electric system, the conditions of sale of electric energy will be established by the parties.

Last modified 9 Feb 2021

Angola

Angola

What are some of the technical, political, financial or regulatory challenges to corporations adopting green energy in the short/medium term in your country and how have these challenges been overcome (or how can they be overcome)?

More incentives and benefits need to be created for companies that want to implement green energy systems. Facilitating the process of importing and accessing currencies to pay for equipment to implement the projects related to renewable energy is necessary. Governments should create incentives for companies that are implemented across the country, thereby creating employment and facilitating greater acceptance of new technologies in rural areas.

Last modified 9 Feb 2021

Angola

Angola

Are there any anticipated regulatory changes which will alter the regulatory landscape for corporate green energy and corporate PPAs?

International development partners are providing technical support to the Angolan government to establish a regulatory framework which includes negotiating power purchase agreements with independent power producers (IPPs) and design of a feed-in-tariff scheme for renewables.

Last modified 9 Feb 2021

Angola

Angola

What is the corporate appetite for green energy, including any political or financial incentives available to corporates to adopt green energy?

Even though national and international companies have been showing interest to develop green energy structures in Angola, this is still something that has to be well studied and thought through it. However, there are already small dimensions of solar energy structures being developed, for example, but only for particular purposes.

What are the key local advantages of the corporate PPA model which can benefit our clients?

The key local advantage of the corporate PPA model in Angola is energy security and easier access to financing having the corporate PPA as collateral.

What subsidies are applicable to the generation and sale of renewable energy?

This information has not been made public.

Does your country implement a national support scheme with tradable green certificates (such as guarantees of origins)?

Not yet, as green energy has not yet been implemented.

Last modified 9 Feb 2021

Angola

Angola

To the extent corporate PPAs are deployed, how are prices, terms and risks affected?

Do prices tend to be floating or fixed?

According to Article 26 of the Presidential Decree 178/20 of June 25, the tariff structure is applied by the RNT concessionaire and by the distribution companies to users connected to their networks. Along these lines, this same diploma, on its article 27, establishes that the tariff structure reflects the costs to which users give rise, according to the characteristics of consumption and the level of tension to which they are connected, regardless of their social or legal character and the final destination give to the energy consumed. 

Hence, the prices are fixed considering the elements above mentioned.

What term is typically agreed for the PPAs?

There is not a fixed-term for cPPAs it all depends on the activity to be exercised. However, it is important to mention that the tariff regime is, in general terms, in force in a four-year tariff regime. Alongside with that, the tariff period is defined by a specific diploma by the Sector Regulatory Entity, which must be multiannual, as established on Article 28-A of the Presidential Decree 178/20 of June 25.

Are the PPAs take-or-pay or limited volume?

Not applicable.

Are there any other typical risks?

Not applicable.

To the extent corporate PPAs are deployed, in whose favour will the risks typically be balanced?

Volume risk

The risk is born by those who not comply with rule applicable to the specific situation.

Change in law

Usually, when changing legislation, users and distributors are given a period to prepare and adapt to this mentioned change of legislation. Hence, when there is a change in law non complied with, the risk is born by those who have not complied with the rule in place.

Increase / reduction of benefits

Again, similar to the change in law, the risk is born by those who not comply with rule applicable to the specific situation.

Market liberalization (if applicable)

Not applicable.

Credit risk

The risk is born by those who not comply with rule applicable to the specific situation.

Imbalance power risk

The risk is born by those who not comply with rule applicable to the specific situation.

Production profile risk

The risk is born by those who not comply with rule applicable to the specific situation.

Last modified 9 Feb 2021

Angola

Angola

Does your country operate a balancing responsibility scheme?

Not applicable.

If your country operates a balancing responsibility scheme, who is the balancing authority and do the generator and offtaker typically undertake balancing themselves?

Not applicable. 

Last modified 9 Feb 2021

Angola

Angola

What significant transactions/deals have taken place in the last 12-18 months?

Laúca Hydroelectric Power Plant

According to the Government, Laúca Hydroelectric Power Plant (“AH Laúca”) is the largest work in the country today. The Project was commissioned by the Angolan Executive, represented by the Ministry of Energy and Water, and is carried out by ODEBRECHT. COBA and LA MAYER carry out the supervision of the implementation of the project. When AH Laúca is 100% operational, it will produce more than twice as much energy as the other two dams already operating on the Kwanza River. This energy potential will serve 8 million people. AH Laúca will produce 8,643 GWh (gigawatts) of electricity, representing an installed capacity of 2,070 MW (megawatts).

The realization of the project demands great infrastructure support. Because of this, AH Laúca is today a city that is composed by: Leisure area; Sports area; Accommodations; Kitchen and Cafeterias and Medical Center.

AH Laúca is a pole of job and income generation. The project is also committed to providing opportunities for national talent. Today, the enterprise has 8,458 Members. Of these, 8,035 are national, which represents 95% of the entire productive force involved in the execution of the work. The remaining 423 are expatriates, a number that represents 5% of total members.

Through the Acreditar Program, the project offers basic and specific training to AH Laúca Members and also to the residents of the communities surrounding the construction site.

AH Laúca is 86% ahead of Civil Works, 72% ahead of Electromechanical Assembly and 14% in the Energy Transport System. Always overcoming challenges and fulfilling all the goals set with safety, quality and productivity.

2nd Hydroelectric Power Plant of Cambambe and Dam Alignment

With the conclusion of the Cambambe 2nd Power Station and the Dam Raising, it was possible to obtain an additional power of 780MW. This power is helping to reduce the energy supply deficit in the Provinces of Luanda, Kwanza Sul, Malanje, Uige, Kwanza Norte and Bengo.

It will also allow the interconnection of the North-Central Systems with the Benguela Province link, thus reducing production costs and the consumption of diesel for energy production.

More than 10,000 construction posts have been created as part of the temporary work in the rehabilitation, modernization and extension of the hydroelectric complex. The construction owner was GAMEK (Gabinete de Aproveitamento do Médio Kwanza) and the contractor was ODEBRECTH.

Solar village program

The main objective of the Solar Village Programme is electrification, through the installation of autonomous solar photovoltaic systems (isolated) in infrastructures Social, including: Schools; Medical Posts; Police Posts; Administrative Buildings; and, Social Jangos, including Public Lighting Posts.

In the 1st phase of the Programme, awarded to the company Elektra Electricidade e Águas, Lda, 11 localities were selected from 4 Provinces in the country: Bié, Kuando Kubango, Malange and Moxico. This phase has been completed since 2011, with a total of 156,660 Wp of 42 systems and 70 public lighting posts implemented.

In some cases, a system provides electricity to more than one infrastructure. So far, 50 infrastructures have benefited from the electricity supply, namely: 15 schools, 18 medical posts, 1 maternity ward, 1 police station, 1 police station, 9 administrative residences, 1 nurse's residence, 3 administrations.

In the 2nd phase of the Solar Village Programme, four companies were selected for the installation of a total of 75 systems and 160 streetlights.

As part of the 3rd phase of the Solar Village Programme, the project has already started after the Auto de Consignation signed with the Company LTP Energias S.A. The project will benefit the provinces of Kwanza Sul, Cuando Cubango and Lunda Sul, whose aim is to supply electricity to the communities with Solar Photovoltaic Systems of Auto-consumption Kits and Public Photovoltaic Lighting.

It is part of the energy and water sector action plan 2018-2002, to continue the Solar Village Programme and to ensure adequate maintenance of its infrastructure and test a new concept of a 100% solar mini network, based on batteries, to electrify the most isolated municipality headquarters, avoiding fuel logistics.

What transactions/deals are anticipated to come to market in the next 12-18 months?

See Past transactions

Last modified 9 Feb 2021