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  • Legal system, currency, language

    Constitutional. The official currency is the Kwanza (AOA). The official language is Portuguese.

  • Corporate presence requirements & payroll set-up

    A foreign entity may engage employees in Angola with proper payroll registrations, subject to business, corporate and tax considerations. The employer is responsible for withholding from an employee's pay, and delivering to the tax authority, income tax and contributions to Angolan social security. The level of income tax is defined by the government and varies in line with the employee's salary.

  • Pre-hire checks

    Required

    Immigration compliance and pre-hire medical examinations.

    Permissible

    Reference and education checks are permissible.

  • Immigration

    Criminal and medical checks must be issued by competent authorities, a criminal record must be issued by the home country and a medical certificate must be issued by a doctor in the employee’s home country.

    The visa/work permit requirements for overseas nationals to work in Angola are having a recognized travel document valid for the Angolan territory for at least 6 months, being of legal age, not being included in the national list of undesirable persons prohibited from entering into the national territory, not constituting a danger to public order or to social security interests, complying with all health regulations established by the Ministry of Health for entry into the national territory, having an employment contract or promissory employment contract, having a certificate of professional and educational qualifications and curriculum vitae, and obtaining a positive opinion of the competent Ministry.

  • Hiring options

    Employee

    Indefinite-term contract (which is the rule), fixed-term or open-term (ie, a term contract whose termination date has not yet been defined, but that will be terminated as soon as the underlying need for contracting is no longer verified – for example, as a contract to cover absence), part-time contract, telework contract and contract under service commission regime – a particular type of contract for high-level employees which provides flexibility for termination and is not common. The parties may execute an employment contract for a fixed term or open term, which must be done in writing.  Part-time, fixed-term and open-term employees may not be discriminated against due to their status.

    Independent contractor

    Independent contractors may be engaged directly by the company or via a personal services company. Engagement may be subject to misclassification exposure. The factors that tend to indicate an individual is an employee (rather than, for example, a self-employed independent contractor) are the existence of a work schedule, the scheduling of vacation, the worker’s legal subordination to the company, the company’s authority, direction and disciplinary powers, control of punctuality and attendance over the individual, integration into the structure of the company and use of work tools belonging to the company, among others.

    In the event of misclassification, the relationship may be converted into an employment relationship on a permanent basis, and the employer may be liable to pay a fine for non-compliance.

    Agency worker

    Agency workers may only be engaged to fulfill a temporary need for work. The agency work contract duration depends on the underlying reason for hiring and does not typically exceed 12 months. Agency workers have the right to equal treatment to employees in relation to pay and other regular benefits.

  • Employment contracts & policies

    Employment contracts

    Written employment contracts are common but not mandatory, except for fixed-term, part-time, telework and service commission regime contracts as well as contracts with foreign employees and underage employees. Employment contracts cannot contain conditions that are less favorable to employees than mandatory employment legislation.

    Probationary periods

    Permissible.

    Employment contracts for an unlimited period of time may be subject to a probation period corresponding to the first 60 days of performance of work; the parties may, by written agreement, reduce or waive this period.

    The parties may extend the probation period, in writing, to up to 4 months in case of employees who perform highly technical, complex work that is difficult to evaluate, and to up to 6 months in case of employees who perform management duties.

    In an employment contract for a limited period of time, the parties may set forth a probation period in writing, and its duration cannot exceed 15 days in case of non-qualified employees, or 30 days in case of qualified employees. Angolan law does not define qualified and non-qualified, but the common practice is that qualified employees correspond to positions that involve technical complexity, a high degree of responsibility or special qualifications as well as those carrying out functions of trust.

    Policies

    Employers with more than 50 employees must, in order to organize the work and labor discipline, draft and approve employee handbooks, guidelines, instructions, service orders and work rules defining rules for the technical organization of work, performance of work and work discipline, delegation of powers, employee job descriptions, safety, hygiene and health protection of work, performance indicators, a remuneration system, working hours for the several sections of the company or work center, control of entrances and exits and circulation within the premises of the company, and surveillance and control of production.

    Employers with 50 or fewer employees may, but are not required to, implement employee handbooks on the matters described above.

    Third-party approval

    Whenever the employee’s handbook or any other rules and regulations establish rules on performance and discipline, remuneration systems, work performance or safety, hygiene and health protection at work, the employer must forward such regulations for information and registration purposes to the General Labor Inspectorate.

  • Language requirements

    Portuguese. Nevertheless, employment contracts and other documents may be drafted in a bilingual template.

  • Minimum employment rights

    Employees entitled to minimum employment rights

    All employees are entitled to minimum employment rights.

    Working hours

    Maximum daily and weekly working hours are 8 hours per day and 44 hours per week. Overtime pay is required for hours worked in excess of these limits. These limits are inapplicable to employees who perform direction and leadership duties, duties of inspection, or provide direct support to the employer. In case the employee usually performs their work outside the company's premises, an exemption regime may also be agreed upon by the parties, in which case those limits shall not apply. Typically, employees under the exemption regime are entitled to an exemption bonus.

    Overtime

    Overtime may occur with an extraordinary increase in workload, to prevent serious damage or if due to majeure force. It is subject to the following maximum limits: (a) 2 hours per day, (b) 40 hours per month and (c) 200 hours per year.

    Overtime must be compensated with additional payment (ie, an increase of hourly rates) up to 30 hours per month: 50 percent. 30 percent, 20 percent and 10 percent depending on whether it is a large, medium, small or micro company dependent on number of employees and turnover. A company which is a subsidiary or branch of a company with headquarters abroad always qualifies as a large company. Overtime that exceeds that limit is paid for each hour at an additional 75 percent, 45 percent, 20 percent and 10 percent depending on whether it is a large, medium, small or micro company.

    Wages

    The minimum wage is established by Presidential Decree. It is set out as a general minimum wage, but there is also a minimum wage for trade and extractive industry groups, transport services and manufacturing groups and agriculture groups. Under the Decree currently in force, the general minimum wage is AOA21,454.10. The following sector-specific minimum wages also apply:

    • Trade and extractive industry groups: AOA32,181.15
    • Transport services and manufacturing groups: AOA26,817.63 and
    • Agriculture groups: AOA21,454.10.

    Vacation

    Minimum 22 working days per year, plus 12 public national holidays.

    Sick leave & pay

    Employees are entitled to take off as much time as they need for sick leave. For large and medium companies: In case of incapacity to work due to illness or common accident, pay is required in the amount corresponding to 100 percent of the base salary for a period of 2 months. For as long as the employee is not entitled to protection in case of illness or common accident from the social security authorities, the employer must pay to the employee 50 percent of salary from the 3rd to the 12th month.

    In case of small and micro companies: The employee is paid, in case of illness or common accident, the amount of 50 percent of the base salary within 90 days, after which the contract is terminated by expiration if the condition of illness remains.

    Maternity/parental leave & pay

    A pregnant employee is entitled to a paid maternity leave of 3 months. The amount of the maternity allowance is equal to the average of the 2 best monthly salaries from the 6 months preceding the commencement of the maternity leave. The maternity allowance is paid directly by the employer to the employee and, subsequently, the Social Security services reimburse the employer in full. Fathers are not entitled to any leave on the birth of a child; it is only considered as a justifiable reason for absence from work for 1 day.

  • Discrimination

    Discrimination based on the following protected characteristics is prohibited: race, color, gender, ethnic origin, marital status, origin or social rank, religious beliefs, political opinion, union affiliation and language.

  • Benefits & pensions

    Both employer and employee must pay contributions to social security in Angola to cover various employee benefits (eg, maternity leave payment and retirement pension). The employer must withhold the contribution due by the employee and deliver both contributions (ie, employer and employee) to social security every month.

    Current general rates are 3 percent of the gross wage for the employee and 8 percent for the employer.

    Employees with a minimum contributory period (ie, 35 years) qualify for a retirement pension at age 60 or in cases of total incapacity.

    Employers have no legal obligation to provide complementary or supplementary social benefits in addition to the social coverage provided for by the social public scheme. However, some companies – mostly large companies or multinational companies who have their own schemes worldwide – set up and provide private complementary health and pension schemes to their employees.

  • Data privacy

    The Data Privacy Law No. 22/11, June 17 governs Angolan data privacy and determines, in general terms, how to collect, use, disclose, store and give access to "personal information."

    There is no specific regulation on employee data privacy.

  • Rules in transactions/business transfers

    Provided that the same business activity is maintained, the new employer takes the position of the former employer in the employment contracts and takes their position in respect of the rights and obligations arising from the employment relationships. This is the case even if the employment contract is terminated before the transfer. The new employer takes their position as the employer of such former employees in respect of due and non-paid credits. All credits, rights and obligations of the employer arising from the execution and implementation of the employment contract, its violation or termination are subject to a statute of limitations of 1 year starting on the day following the day of termination of the contract. Employees keep the same seniority and acquired rights which they had in the service of their former employer.

    The new employer undertakes the obligations of the former employer limited to those incurred during the 12 months prior to the modification, provided that, up to 22 business days prior to the modification, the new mployer gives notice to the employees that they must claim their credits up to the 2nd business day prior to the date scheduled for such modification. Within 22 business days following the modification of employer, the employees have the right to terminate the employment contract with prior notice, but this does not confer any right to compensation.

  • Employee representation

    Employee representative bodies are permissible but not mandatory.

    Trade unions are not common in Angola.

    In order to carry out their duties, trade union representatives are entitled to 4 paid hours a month but must notify the employer in advance of the date and number of days they require for the exercise of trade union functions. Employers are obliged to provide a suitable place for workers' meetings whenever this is requested by the union representatives. Special protections against dismissal are granted to employees who perform, or have performed, duties as union representatives, either as leaders or delegates, or members of the employees’ representative body performing union-related activities.

  • Termination

    Grounds

    Unilateral termination by the employer: dismissal based on objective grounds (ie, redundancy reasons); disciplinary dismissal with just cause (ie, based on serious breach of the employee's duties).

    Termination without cause (with notice): only for employees hired under an employment contract of service commission regime (a particular type of contract for high-level employees which provides flexibility for termination but is not common).

    Other termination causes: mutual agreement, termination by the employee (ie, termination with notice or constructive dismissal with just cause), expiration (ie, fixed-term and open-term contracts or retirement).

    Employees subject to termination laws

    All employees.

    Restricted or prohibited terminations

    Special protection against dismissal is granted to employees who perform, or have performed, duties as union representatives, either as leaders or delegates, or members of the employees’ representative body performing activities; women covered by the regime of maternity protection; war veterans as per the definition provided by the applicable law; employees under the legal age; employees with a reduced work capacity or with a disability degree equal or higher than 20 percent.

    As a general rule, a copy of the notice served on the employee must be forwarded to General Labor Inspectorate.

    Third-party approval for termination/termination documents

    Except in respect of protected employees, third-party approval is not required to terminate an employment.

    Mass layoff rules

    If economic, technological or structural circumstances occur, which may be clearly demonstrated and which involve an internal reorganization or conversion, or the reduction or the shutting down of activities, which makes it necessary to eliminate or significantly change job positions, the employer may terminate the employment contracts of the employees who perform such job positions.

    Collective dismissal rules are triggered if the dismissal involves at least 20 employees.

    Information to the General Labour Inspectorate is required. However, there is no need to obtain approval for termination.

    The General Labor Inspectorate may undertake the diligence deemed necessary for clarification of the situation and, in case of a collective dismissal, during the period in which the evaluation of the General Labor Inspectorate occurs, the employer may promote a meeting with the representative body or with the committee appointed for the purpose of exchange of information and clarification and may forward the conclusions of the meetings to the General Labor Inspectorate.

    Notice

    For individual dismissals based on objective grounds (up to 20 employees): the employer must forward, at least 30 days in advance, prior notice of dismissal to the employee or employees who occupy the job positions to be extinguished or transformed.

    For collective dismissal: the prior notice is 60 days.

    Notice periods in case of term contract: 15 business days if its duration is equal to or higher than 3 months.

    Statutory right to pay in lieu of notice or garden leave

    Payment in lieu of notice is permitted (and required if the notice period is not honored).

    Garden leave is allowed during the notice period.

    Severance

    Fair dismissal based on objective grounds (redundancy/collective dismissal):

    • Large companies: compensation corresponds to 1 base salary for each year of effective service up to the limit of 5 and an additional 50 percent of the base salary multiplied by the number of years of service that exceed such limit
    • Medium companies: compensation corresponds to 1 base salary for each year of effective service up to the limit of 3 and an additional 40 percent of the base salary multiplied by the number of years of service which exceed such limit
    • Small companies: compensation corresponds to 2 base salary and an additional 30 percent of the base salary multiplied by the number of years of service which exceed the limit of 2 years
    • Micro companies: compensation corresponds to 2 base salary and an additional 20 percent of the base salary multiplied by the number of years of service which exceed the limit of 2 years

       

      Fair disciplinary dismissal: no severance.

      Higher severance payments may be agreed and are usual as a way to avoid litigation.

  • Post-termination restraints

    A clause of the employment contract which restricts the activity of the employee for a period of time, which may not exceed 3 years from the termination of the contract, is lawful if the following conditions are met: (a) such clause is included, in writing, in the employment contract, or in its addendum; (b) the activity performed may cause real damage to the employer and may be considered as unfair competition; (c) the employee is paid a salary during the period of restriction of work: the corresponding amount will be included in the contract or its addendum, and it must be taken into account, in its calculation, the fact that the employer may have incurred in significant expenses in the professional training of the employee.

    A clause which requires an employee who benefits from professional improvement or higher level education at the expense of the employer to remain at the service of the same employer for a certain period of time, provided that such period does not exceed 1 year, in case of training of professional improvement and up to 3 years in case of courses of high level education, is also lawful if established in writing. In this case, the employee may release themselves from remaining at the employer’s service by repaying to the employer the amount of the expenses incurred by the employer, in proportion to the remaining time until the term of the agreed period. The employer that hires the employee within the period of restriction of activity in the company is jointly liable for the damages caused by the employee or for the amount not returned by the employee.

  • Waivers

    In principle, statutory rights cannot be waived and any waiver of such rights will be null and void.

  • Remedies

    Discrimination

    Fine corresponding to 5 to 10 times the average salary paid by the company.

    Unfair Dismissal

    The employee may challenge the validity of the dismissal before the labor courts.

    If the relevant court declares the dismissal to be unlawful, by final judgment, the employer must immediately re-instate the employee in the same job position and benefiting from the same previous conditions, or, alternatively, shall indemnify the employee (compensation is different depending on whether it is a large, medium, small or micro company and the cause of dismissal).

    In addition to re-instatement or the compensation, the employee is entitled to the base salaries they would have received if they had continued to perform work, until the date on which the employee finds a new job or up to the date of final judgment, whichever comes first, with a maximum limit of 6 months of base salary for large companies, 4 months to medium companies and 2 months for small and micro companies.

    Failure to inform and consult

    Not applicable.

  • Criminal sanctions

    Typically, non-compliance with employment laws leads to administrative proceedings which may lead to the payment of fines. If such non-compliance is based on violation of rights that deserve protection under criminal law, it may also lead to this type of judicial proceedings.

  • Key contacts

Key contacts

Angola

Argentina

Alberto Rubio
Alberto Rubio
Partner DLA Piper (Argentina) [email protected] View bio
Florencia Fabio
Florencia Fabio
Associate DLA Piper (Argentina) [email protected] T +5411 41145500 View bio

Australia

Nicholas Turner
Nicholas Turner
Partner DLA Piper Australia [email protected] T +61 2 9286 8522 View bio

Austria

Stephan Nitzl
Stephan Nitzl
Partner DLA Piper Austria [email protected] T +43 1 531 78 1981 View bio

Bahrain

Mohamed Toorani
Mohamed Toorani
Legal Director DLA Piper Bahrain [email protected] T +973 1755 0896 View bio

Belgium

Eddy Lievens
Eddy Lievens
Partner DLA Piper UK [email protected] T +32 (0) 2 500 1502 View bio

Brazil

Mauricio Tanabe
Mauricio Tanabe
Partner Campos Mello Advogados [email protected] T +55 21 3262 3011
Marcio Meira de Vasconcellos
Marcio Meira de Vasconcellos
Partner Campos Mello Advogados [email protected] T +55 21 3262 3029 View bio

Canada

Richard J. Nixon
Richard J. Nixon
Partner DLA Piper Canada [email protected] T +1 416 365 3521 View bio
Allen Soltan
Allen Soltan
Partner DLA Piper Canada [email protected] T +1 604 643 2970 View bio

Chile

Luis Parada
Luis Parada
Partner DLA Piper Chile [email protected] T +56 2 2798 2606 View bio

China

Johnny Choi
Johnny Choi
Partner DLA Piper UK [email protected] T +86 10 8520 0709 View bio

Colombia

Diana Zuleta Martínez
Diana Zuleta Martínez
Director DLA Piper Martinez Beltran [email protected]

Czech Republic

Miroslav Dubovský
Miroslav Dubovský
Partner DLA Piper Czech Republic [email protected] T +420 222 817 500 View bio
Ondřej Chlada
Ondřej Chlada
Senior Associate DLA Piper Czech Republic [email protected] T +420 222 817 826 View bio

Denmark

Nina Wedsted
Nina Wedsted
Partner DLA Piper Denmark [email protected] T +45 3334 0050 View bio

Finland

Riikka Autio
Riikka Autio
Partner DLA Piper Finland Attorneys Ltd. [email protected] T +358 5 0344 6582

France

Philippe Danesi
Philippe Danesi
Partner DLA Piper France LLP [email protected] T +33 (0)1 40 15 24 23 View bio
Marine Gicquel
Marine Gicquel
Partner DLA Piper France LLP [email protected] T +33 (0)1 40 15 24 71 View bio
Bijan Eghbal
Bijan Eghbal
Partner DLA Piper France LLP [email protected] T +33 (0)1 40 15 24 70 View bio
Jérôme Halphen
Jérôme Halphen
Partner DLA Piper France LLP [email protected] T +33 (0)1 40 15 66 36 View bio

Germany

Dr. Kai Bodenstedt LL.M.
Dr. Kai Bodenstedt LL.M.
Partner, Head of Employment DLA Piper UK LLP [email protected] T +49 40 188 88 158 View bio

Hong Kong, SAR

Helen Colquhoun
Helen Colquhoun
Partner DLA Piper Hong Kong [email protected] T +85221030840 View bio

Hungary

Helga Fehér
Helga Fehér
Partner DLA Piper Hungary [email protected] T +36 1 510 1100 View bio

India

Nohid Nooreyezdan
Nohid Nooreyezdan
AZB & Partners [email protected]

Indonesia

Lia Alizia
Lia Alizia
Makarim & Taira [email protected]
Golden Mandala
Golden Mandala
Makarim & Taira S. [email protected]

Ireland

Ciara McLoughlin
Ciara McLoughlin
Partner DLA Piper Ireland [email protected] View bio
Alice Duffy
Alice Duffy
Legal Director DLA Piper Ireland [email protected] T +353 1 487 6659 View bio

Israel

Benjamin Sandler
Benjamin Sandler
Partner Yigal Arnon & Co [email protected] T +972 2 623 9200 View bio

Italy

Giampiero Falasca
Giampiero Falasca
Partner DLA Piper Italy [email protected] T +39 06 68 880 1 View bio
Fabrizio Morelli
Fabrizio Morelli
Partner DLA Piper Italy [email protected] T +39 06 68 880 1 View bio

Japan

Lawrence Carter
Lawrence Carter
Partner DLA Piper Tokyo [email protected] T +81 3 4550 2811 View bio

Kenya

William Maema
William Maema
Senior Partner IKM Advocates [email protected]

Kuwait

Neil Crossley
Neil Crossley
Partner DLA Piper UAE [email protected] T +971 4 438 6345 View bio

Luxembourg

Olivier Reisch
Olivier Reisch
Partner DLA Piper Luxembourg [email protected] T +352 26 29 04 2017 View bio

Malaysia

Marcus van Geyzel
Marcus van Geyzel
Peter Ling & van Geyzel [email protected]

Mexico

María Eugenia Ríos Espinosa
María Eugenia Ríos Espinosa
Partner DLA Piper Mexico [email protected] T +52 55 5261 1805 View bio

Morocco

Mehdi Kettani
Mehdi Kettani
Partner DLA Piper Morocco [email protected] T +212 (0)520 42 78 30 View bio

Mozambique

Gimina Mahumana Langa
Gimina Mahumana Langa
Partner SAL & Caldeira Advogados, Lda Mozambique [email protected] T +258 21 241400

Myanmar

Netherlands

Hélène Bogaard
Hélène Bogaard
Partner DLA Piper Netherlands [email protected] T +31 (0)20 5419 841 View bio

New Zealand

Laura Scampion
Laura Scampion
Partner DLA Piper New Zealand [email protected] T +64 9 916 3779 View bio

Nigeria

Samuel Salako
Samuel Salako
Olajide Oyewole [email protected]

Norway

Per Benonisen
Per Benonisen
Partner DLA Piper Norway [email protected] T +47 24 13 15 00 View bio

Oman

Neil Crossley
Neil Crossley
Partner DLA Piper UAE [email protected] T +971 4 438 6345 View bio

Peru

Philippines

Roy Enrico C. Santos
Roy Enrico C. Santos
PJS Law [email protected]

Poland

Agnieszka Lechman-Filipiak
Agnieszka Lechman-Filipiak
Partner DLA Piper Poland [email protected] T +48 22 540 74 61 View bio

Portugal

Benjamim Mendes
Benjamim Mendes
Partner DLA Piper ABBC [email protected] T +351 21 358 36 20 View bio

Qatar

Neil Crossley
Neil Crossley
Partner DLA Piper UAE [email protected] T +971 4 438 6345 View bio

Romania

Monica Georgiadis
Monica Georgiadis
Partner DLA Piper Romania [email protected] T +40 372 155 812 View bio

Russia

Vladislav Mazur
Vladislav Mazur
Legal Director DLA Piper Rus Limited [email protected] T +7 (495) 221 4431 View bio

Saudi Arabia

Neil Crossley
Neil Crossley
Partner DLA Piper UAE [email protected] T +971 4 438 6345 View bio

Singapore

David Smail
David Smail
Of Counsel DLA Piper [email protected] T +65 6512 9564 View bio

Slovak Republic

JUDr. Dr. Michaela Stessl
JUDr. Dr. Michaela Stessl
Country Managing Partner DLA Piper Slovak Republic [email protected] T +421 2 5920 2122 View bio
Daniela Koncierova
Daniela Koncierova
Senior Associate DLA Piper Slovak Republic [email protected] T +421 2 5920 2122 View bio

South Africa

Monique Jefferson
Monique Jefferson
Director DLA Piper South Africa [email protected] T +27 64 880 8523 View bio

South Korea

Hoin Lee
Hoin Lee
Kim & Chang [email protected]

Spain

Pilar Menor
Pilar Menor
Partner DLA Piper Spain [email protected] T +34 91 319 12 12 View bio
Raul Torres
Raul Torres
Legal Director DLA Piper Spain [email protected] T +34 91 319 1212 View bio

Sweden

Björn Rustare
Björn Rustare
Partner DLA Piper Sweden [email protected] T +46 8 701 78 07 View bio

Switzerland

Vincent Carron
Vincent Carron
Schellenberg Wittmer [email protected]

Taiwan, Republic of China

John Eastwood
John Eastwood
Eiger Law [email protected]

Thailand

Komson Suntheeraporn
Komson Suntheeraporn
Of Counsel DLA Piper [email protected] T +66 2 686 8557 View bio

Tunisia

Turkey

Maral Minasyan
Maral Minasyan
Kolcuoğlu Demirkan Koçaklı Attorneys at Law [email protected]

Uganda

Moses Segawa
Moses Segawa
Sebalu and Lule [email protected]

Ukraine

Margarita Karpenko
Margarita Karpenko
Managing Partner DLA Piper Ukraine [email protected] T +380 44 490 95 65 View bio

United Arab Emirates

Neil Crossley
Neil Crossley
Partner DLA Piper UAE [email protected] T +971 4 438 6345 View bio

United Kingdom

Tim Marshall
Tim Marshall
Partner DLA Piper UK LLP [email protected] T +44 (0)20 7796 6617 View bio

United States

Brian Kaplan
Brian Kaplan
Partner DLA Piper LLP (US) [email protected] T +1 212 335 4515 View bio
Ute Krudewagen
Ute Krudewagen
Partner DLA Piper LLP (US) [email protected] T +1 650 833 2245 View bio
Rita Patel
Rita Patel
Partner DLA Piper LLP (US) [email protected] T +1 202 799 4242 View bio
Cassie Boyle
Cassie Boyle
Practice Group Director DLA Piper LLP (US) [email protected] T +1 312 368 7915

Venezuela

Victorino Márquez
Victorino Márquez
D’Empaire Abogados vmarquez @dra.com.ve
Biba Arciniegas
Biba Arciniegas
D’Empaire Abogados barciniegas @dra.com.ve

Vietnam

Marion Carles-Salmon
Marion Carles-Salmon
Regional Senior Legal Adviser | Head of Labor and Employment Practice Group DFDL (Thailand) Ltd. [email protected] T +662 059 4090